We store cookies on your device to make sure we give you the best experience on this website. I'm fine with this - Turn cookies off
Switch to an accessible version of this website which is easier to read. (requires cookies)

Brighton and Hove Liberal Democrats

European Union News

  • A pen marking an X in a box.
    Article: Jan 19, 2018
    By Rhiannon Leaman

    In this year's local elections, EU Citizens can vote. For many of them, it'll be their one and only chance to make their voice heard on Brexit at the ballot box.

    And in many places, winning the EU citizen's vote could be a big boost to a Liberal Democrat campaign.

    Sorry, the rest of this article is just for members.

    If you're a member, log in here:

    Log in

    Forgotten your password? Reset it here.

    If you'd like to become a member, you can join today from just £1 a month:

    Join today

  • Wera Hobhouse (Chris McAndrew [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)
    Article: Jan 17, 2018
    By Wera Hobhouse in Liiberal Democrat Voice

    There are two democratic principles that, taken together, demand a referendum on the deal. The first is that a democratic decision should be enforced, and the second is that no democratic decision has an indefinite mandate.

    The first principle, taken alone, is being used by the Conservatives and Labour to oppose a referendum on the deal. This is the argument:

  • The flags of EU countries flying.
    Article: Jan 12, 2018
    By Tom Brake

    Brexit could cause the UK to lose half a million jobs and nearly £50bn in investment by 2030, a report commissioned by Sadiq Khan has found.

    The London Mayor said the government should negotiate to stay in the single market and customs union.

    It comes days after Jeremy Corbyn refused to attend a cross-party summit on keeping the UK in the single market.

    This bombshell report should make obligatory bedtime reading for Jeremy Corbyn.

    Half a million jobs could be a lost as a result of the hard Brexit that Corbyn has ordered his MPs to vote for.

    The Labour leadership must listen to the Mayor of London and back efforts to minimise the impact of Brexit by keeping Britain in the Single Market and Customs Union.

    It's also crucial that the option of an exit from Brexit is kept on the table through a vote on the deal.

    We can protect jobs and living standards against a botched Conservative Brexit, but only if Labour comes off the fence.

  • Vince Cable (Chris McAndrew [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)
    Article: Jan 10, 2018
    By Vince Cable MP, Leader of the Liberal Democrats

    This morning I attended the Single Market Summit, the start of a cross-party initiative between opposition leaders to oppose the Conservatives' hard Brexit.

    To the anger of many Labour MPs - and to my great disappointment, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn refused to attend.

    What is disappointing is that the Labour leadership has declined to take part in this summit

  • Nick Clegg
    Article: Jan 7, 2018

    Nick Clegg fears the Government will give Parliament an incomplete Brexit deal to vote on. "The government's clear intention is to try and lull parliament into signing away the future before it has spelled out what that future holds," the former deputy PM told Business Insider this week.

    Nick Clegg believes the Government will sideline Parliament by putting an incomplete Brexit deal to the vote on at the end of Article 50 talks.

  • Article: Dec 20, 2017

    Britain should have an EU referendum on the final deal in December in 2018. There would be a 12-week campaign starting in September to give the UK the option to accept a deal or stay in the EU.

    This would be compatible with the tight timetable of EU withdrawal, falling within the article 50 timeframe of two years, which will end in March 2019.

  • Article: Dec 11, 2017

    Responding to the news a Brexit deal has been agreed by Theresa May and the EU in Brussels, Liberal Democrat Leader Vince Cable said:

    "This agreement is welcome as it reduces the risk of a catastrophic No Deal Brexit. It also includes a role for the EU Court of Justice for eight years, a notable concession.

    "But how long will this deal last before it is torn apart by Theresa May's own MPs? And what will happen next, seeing as the Cabinet hasn't even discussed yet what the final Brexit outcome should look like?

    "There are still two opposing views in government, those who want a close arrangement with the EU and those who want to tear apart decades of work building ties with our closest trading partner.

    "And there is still no solution over how to prevent a border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. The biggest obstacle to the government's Brexit plans is being kicked into the long grass.

    "The government is still a long way from a final deal, and even further from delivering on what the Brexiters promised.

    "At the end of this process it is the British people, not Tory MPs and the DUP, who should get to decide whether the deal is good enough."

  • Nick Clegg
    Article: Dec 4, 2017
    By Dorian Lynskey in The Guardian

    The former deputy PM and the Nobel prize winner discuss the EU, business and Trump

    Richard Thaler was awarded the Nobel prize for economics in October, for work that has "built a bridge between the economic and psychological analyses of individual decision-making". While traditional economics assumes that people are rational actors, Thaler explores the consequences of irrationality, bias and error, and proposes ways that governments, through mechanisms as simple as changing the phrasing on a form, can encourage, or "nudge", smarter decision-making. Nudge, the 2008 bestseller he wrote with Cass Sunstein, introduced the influential concept of "choice architecture", while his 2015 book Misbehaving was a personal history of behavioural economics. As the author Michael Lewis put it, he's "the economist who realised how crazy we are".

  • Article: Nov 30, 2017

    The Brexit divorce bill will just be the down-payment on an economically disastrous extreme Brexit that would take us out of the single market and customs union.

    Around £45 billion would appear to be the price Johnson and Gove et al are willing to pay for a deluded vision of an imperial Britain post-Brexit.

    This vision already sees the UK with higher inflation and debt, falling investment and less influence in the world.

    And this acrimonious divorce settlement will merely be the down payment.

    The hit to the UK economy of pulling out of the single market and customs threatens to dwarf this £45bn, with falling tax revenues and companies leaving the UK.

    Only the Lib Dems are fighting to save Britain's free trade with its largest market and to give the people a say on the final deal.

  • Article: Nov 29, 2017

    The government's refusal to publish its Brexit impact assessments is "completely untenable". Speaker John Bercow said he will respond promptly to any allegations of contempt of Parliament.

    This whole farce has descended into a scene straight out of Yes Minister.

    After David Davis repeatedly stated there were 57 detailed impact assessments, ministers now claim these reports never even existed in this form.

    Editing these reports is a breach of the agreement reached with MPs, meaning action over contempt of Parliament now looms.

    If the government really believes in its own Brexit plans, why are they so scared of publishing these reports in full?

    The public deserve to know what Brexit means for their jobs, incomes and communities. They must then be offered a vote on the deal with a chance to exit from Brexit.

  • Article: Nov 27, 2017

    Speaking on the Today programme, Australian trade minister Steve Cobbio criticised the government's post-Brexit trade plans to split food import quotas between the UK and the EU.

    Listen to the report:

    Yet again the government has been warned that isolating ourselves from the EU is not the straightforward panacea dreamt of by Brextremists.

    There are real concerns that the UK is going to struggle to strike any deals that come remotely close to the benefits we enjoy as a member of the EU.

    This is another reason why the British public must have a vote on the terms of this messy divorce, including the option of an Exit from Brexit.

  • Article: Nov 15, 2017

    On the face of it, this seems like a major concession. But the reality is it simply isn't good enough.

    First of all, David Davis has said that even if Parliament votes down the deal, the UK will still leave the EU. This means MPs are essentially being told to take it or leave it.

    Secondly, the government is agreeing to give MPs a say on the final Brexit deal but not the public.

  • Article: Nov 14, 2017

    The Government's majority is wafer thin - and if MPs from all parties work together, there's a real chance we can defeat them and at the very least, stop them from pursuing a hard Brexit.

    That's why we're asking you to contact your MP and ask them to support four amendments (you can find out more about the amendments below).

  • Tom Brake (By Chris McAndrew - https://api20170418155059.azure-api.net/photo/bhDYT87s.jpeg?crop=CU_1:1&quality=80&download=trueGallery: https://beta.parliament.uk/media/bhDYT87s, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=61321850)
    Article: Nov 6, 2017
    By Tom Brake in Liberal Democrat Voice

    When people voted in the EU referendum last year, nobody really knew what a future deal with the European Union might look like.

    16 months on it is now clearer than ever that no deal will be anywhere near as good a deal as the one we have now. To top that off, a catastrophic "no deal" scenario is becoming likelier than ever.

  • Article: Oct 28, 2017

    New research by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance and the Liberal Democrats has revealed just how damaging a no deal Brexit will be to our City.

    A no deal Brexit will mean an economic hit of £1.96 billion to over the first five years after we fall out of the EU.

    David Davis and other members of the cabinet have recently been talking up a no deal Brexit, but this data shows that the country simply couldn't afford it.

    If the UK exits the EU in March 2019 without a deal, Britain's economic output (gross value added) in the five years after Brexit would be reduced by 5.3%, or £430 billion.

    Even if the UK agreed to a Norway style arrangement with full single market access, this would still result in a reduction to five-year economic output of 2.9%, or £235 billion.

    Local LibDem Parliamentary Candidate Carrie Hynds said:

    "These figures are a real indictment of the government's strategy. David Davis is still talking up the possibility of a no-deal Brexit, yet these figures suggest that would cost Brighton and Hove a ruinous £1.96 billion over five years. Even a relatively soft Brexit could cost the City over £1 billion in lost economic activity.

    "The government must rule out a no-deal to end the uncertainty and confirm its commitment to stay in the single market and customs union.

  • Article: Oct 22, 2017
    By Paul Chandler, 2017 election agent for Brighton and Hove LibDems.

    There was recently an interesting article in the Financial Times based around an Ipsos Mori opinion poll on why people voted the way they did in the EU Referendum. The poll took the temperature among 4,000 voters.

    They have discerned six types of voter in the EU Referendum. Here they are with the percentage of the electorate they represent:

  • Article: Oct 21, 2017

    "The Prime Minister cannot say one thing in Brussels and another in Britain. She needs to face down the right-wing Brexiteers in her party in order to guarantee the talks actually move forward. Above all she still needs to protect citizens' rights to ensure they are not a casualty of a no-deal Brexit, and the European Union must also do more to make this happen.

  • Article: Oct 18, 2017

    Rising food prices made a large contribution to the change, with an increase of 0.8% between August and September 2017, compared to a 0.4% fall last year.

    It comes as analysis by the Institute for Fiscal Studies has found the benefits freeze is expected to leave over 10 million families an average of £450 a year worse off in real terms by 2020.

  • Article: Oct 18, 2017

    The OECD has predicted that UK economic growth will slow to 1% in 2018, and that the economy will suffer more in the event of a 'no deal' Brexit.

    However, the Paris-based thinktank also said the economy would see a "significant boost" if there was another referendum leading to Brexit being reversed.

    Liberal Democrat Deputy Leader Jo Swinson commented:

  • B&H Lib Dems at StopBrexit march (Duncan Moore)
    Article: Sep 24, 2017
    By Carrie Hynds, Lib Dem Prospective Parliamentary Candidate for Hove

    On a bright, warm September day we joined the many thousands of people marching through Brighton & Hove for the StopBrexit march. The event was organised by Brighton & Hove for Europe, timed to coincide with the Labour party conference in Brighton.

    We gathered at The Level and set off just after 1pm, stopping briefly to chant outside the Brighton Centre before continuing to Hove Lawns, where the march ended in a rally. There was lots of support en route with passers-by waving, car horns tooting and even a boat flying the EU flag!

  • Article: Sep 17, 2017

    The effects of Brexit are already being felt.

    The value of the pound has plummeted.

    Inflation has risen. Growth in the economy has slowed, and the government is already borrowing billions more to fill the gap in lost tax revenue.

    Growth in the economy has slowed, and the government is already borrowing billions more to fill the gap in lost tax revenue.

  • Carrie Hynds at the 9 September march
    Article: Sep 9, 2017
    By Carrie Hynds

    Today I joined 3,000 Liberal Democrats at Hyde Park Corner. EU flags were waving, placards were being held aloft and there was an abundance of stickers.

    Through the somewhat hit-and-miss medium of handheld loudspeaker, Catherine Bearder MEP addressed the crowd, followed by party leader Vince Cable. They wished us well on the upcoming march and said its timing was key, as Parliament will debate the repeal bill (formally known as the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill) on Monday. The Conservative government has included in the Bill provision to give itself powers over which pieces of EU law remain copied over into UK law, and which are amended or repealed, bypassing any further scrutiny by Parliament. These are known as Henry VIII powers: in short, a power grab.

  • Article: Sep 2, 2017

    At their conference in Bournemouth later this month, the Liberal Democrats will point out all the downsides of leaving the European Union and reinforce its vigorous defence of jobs, living standards, individual rights, international co-operation and the British national interest.

    They will be asked to support the following motion:

  • Article: Aug 25, 2017

    Only 4,600 international students overstayed their visas last year, less than a twentieth of the previous estimates of 100,000, official figures released today have revealed.

    For the first time figures have been published based on exit checks from UK ports, showing that 97 per cent of foreign students left the UK after finishing their studies.

  • Article: Aug 23, 2017

    The government has released its latest Brexit position paper on the role of the EU Court of Justice (ECJ) after Brexit.

    We welcome this sensible and long overdue climbdown by the Prime Minister. It shows Theresa May's red lines are becoming more blurred by the day.

    The government seems to have belatedly accepted it won't be possible to end the EU court's influence in the UK without damaging our free trade and security cooperation with Europe.